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What does caviar taste like? How to know if it is of quality or not?

Answer 1:

With such costs, I expected it to be something special, with everyone wishing they could dine like the affluent. It only tasted like fish the first time I tried it. What a terrible letdown! What’s the big deal about the happy caviar? I had hoped it would taste like a potato omelette, but it didn’t. It’s a fish. I’m afraid I won’t be able to buy it because it’s so costly!

Answer 2:

Palatine ignorance, there are certain meals that no one can digest or eat; it’s like a good book, or a good automobile, or a nice watch, or a decent suit; some people like Zara’s clothing, but not everyone can tell the difference.

Caviar has a strong fish flavor, so strong that it leaves a salty aftertaste in the tongue. It is frequently served with butter and toasted bread, but it still has a strong fish flavor.

By the way, if it’s fish roe, the typical flavor is intense pure flavor that almost burns the mouth, saturates the taste buds, and puts them to sleep; it’s a good time to savor a good wine, though it obviously loses its essence because the maritime goo from the sturgeon roe still runs through your mouth, improving the broth that passes through it.

To begin, and avoid making water, a potato salad with some huelva prawns and a little black adornment would be a good way to ease into the strength of a beautiful product.

Although I do not abstain from stew, rice, anchovies in vinegar, or oysters… the list of things I do not abstain from is enormous…