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Bluefish (Pomatomus saltatrix)

Bluefish Bluefish

Common names for Bluefish

Bluefish, snapper, tailor

Other languages for Bluefish

  • French name: Tassergal
  • Italian name: Pesce serra
  • German name: Blaufisch

Introduction to Bluefish

Bluefish are voracious eaters and aggressive combatants, giving them the fishermen’s nickname “chopper.” Blues may weigh up to 30 pounds; fish weighing more than 10 pounds are referred to as “horses,” while fish weighing less than 1 pound are referred to as “snappers.” The average market weight is between three and five pounds. From Maine to Florida, bluefish migrate up and down the eastern coast, following schools of tiny, oil-rich menhaden, a preferred meal. This diet of pogies imparts a distinct taste to older blues. Younger bluefish consume crustaceans, which results in a more delicate and mild flesh. The Chesapeake Bay region, New Jersey, and Long Island are the primary producers of bluefish, although North Carolina has a sizable winter fishery. Bluefish spoils quickly if not promptly iced, and it does not freeze well. That is why the fish is seldom seen more than a few miles from where it was caught, unless it is flown in as a special by a restaurant. Therefore, purchase in season and treat with care.

Product profile for Bluefish

Bluefish flesh varies in color from light putty to blue-gray with a brownish tint when raw. When cooked, it becomes lighter. Before cooking, remove a strong-flavored, dark strip of flesh from the fillet. The meat of bluefish is gritty, wet, and palatable, with a rich, full flavor. The stronger the flavor, the bigger the fish.

Cooking tips for Bluefish

Bluefish should be cooked within a day of purchase. Blues have a deep, powerful flavor that may be enhanced by acidic components such as lime and lemon juice or tomato. Brush a fillet with mustard or mayonnaise and broil it for a simple entrée. Bluefish can also be baked, roasted, or grilled. Larger bluefish are too greasy to fry, therefore only tiny bluefish may be cooked. Fish that is large enough to be roasted entire can be done.

Nutrition facts for Bluefish

Calories: 124 Fat Calories: 38 Total Fat: 4.2 g Saturated Fat: 0.9 g Cholesterol: 59 mg Sodium: 60 mg Protein: 20 g Omega 3: 0.83 g

Primary product forms for Bluefish

Fresh (raw): Whole, Head-On, Dressed, Fillets, Skin-On Smoked Pâté

Global supply for Bluefish

United States, Iran